STEAM Lesson: Movement Batteries

By | 2016-10-29T11:35:09+00:00 May 21st, 2015|

Overview: Discovering how energy works through dance and batteries

batteriesToday’s free STEAM lesson is all about bringing movement to science through the elements of dance.  I was actually inspired to create this lesson based on a question my daughter asked me in the car.  Out of the blue, she called out, “Mommy, how do batteries work?” and to be honest, I didn’t know how to explain it in a way that she would understand.  After a few YouTube videos and some drawings, she finally came to the conclusion that batteries contain these mysterious things called electrons that move back and forth.  When the movement stops, the battery dies.  Simple, but accurate.

Of course, as we were investigating this together, it started to dawn on me that this would be a great STEAM lesson – after all, what captures movement better than dance?  This lesson seed uses this free elements of dance poster and the core lesson from SEP about “Making a Battery”.  We extend upon its basic concept by having students translate the traditional equations Voltage = Current x Resistance for its movement equivalent: Level = Flow x Weight.  Once this gets started, the lesson just naturally gains momentum!

Enjoy today’s free lesson download – and remember that you can find over 50 more arts integration and STEAM lessons on our lesson page.

GRADE LEVEL: 3-5  |  CONTENT AREAS: Science and Dance

Download This Lesson Here

movement batteries

About the Author:

Susan Riley is the founder and President of EducationCloset.com. She focuses on teacher professional development in arts integration, Common Core State Standards, 21st century learning skills, and technology. She is also a published author and frequent presenter at national conferences on Arts Integration and Arts and the Common Core.Susan holds a Bachelor of Music degree in Music Education from the prestigious Westminster Choir College in Princeton, NJ and a Master of Science in Education Administration from McDaniel College in Westminster, MD. She lives in Westminster, MD with her husband and daughter.Email Susan