Arts Integration Technique – Call and Response

By |2018-10-05T00:06:50-07:00July 20th, 2012|

Today, I’d like to share with you one of my favorite arts integration technique.

Call and Response is fantastic to use with Common Core reading objectives for fluency and comprehension.  Not only that, but it’s a naturally brain-friendly activity that directly connects music skills with critical thinking and reading.  Plus, it’s a simple integration technique that you can put into practice immediately in your classroom!  Give it a try on the first day of school and you’ll have a great engagement tool that also provides a quick opportunity for assessment.  Gotta love that!

3 Comments

  1. Jennifer July 20, 2012 at 3:12 pm - Reply

    Susan, what a fun technique for students. I see how brain friendly it is, and that is wonderful. however I can’t quite see how it moves students towards reading more fluently. Can you explain that a little more? Thanks!

    • Susan Riley July 20, 2012 at 6:50 pm - Reply

      Great question, Jennifer! When you use this technique effectively, students will need to not only track what you are doing at the moment, but also remember and perform back what you did the previous 4 beats. They can’t stop in the middle of this process or they will get lost in the rhythms and “lose the game”. They must fluently “read” both the rhythmic line you are performing and the rhythmic line they are performing.

      Of course, depending on the age group, you could have a set of pre-assigned written rhythms on the board and have each group read the rhythm of the next line as they are performing the one behind it. However, there’s something magical about the spontaneity of improvisation between students and teacher in what rhythms come next.

      • Jennifer July 22, 2012 at 7:14 pm - Reply

        interesting! i do see how the process works, and how it will help the students to be more ‘fluent’ with their rhythms. would you typically make an explicit connection the next time you are working with students in a guided reading group?

Leave A Comment

Share This